Home > FEATURELESS BUILD INFO

Featureless Build Information

On January 1, 2017, the definition of an “assault weapon” (“AW”) under California law was changed to include firearms which were required to be equipped with a “bullet button” or similar magazine locking device. Prominent 2A law firm Michel & Associates prepared a newer "Assault Weapons" Quick Reference Guide with flow chart for the California Rifle & Pistol Association and the NRA. This guide addresses the new classification of "Bullet Button Assault Weapons", and more importantly, details five options on how to stay out of trouble if you own a newly defined "assault weapon". One of those options they address is "Featureless Build", which we prefer with our CRG-15 Compliant Rifle Grip. This download is here with permission from Michel & Associates, P.C.

You can download the PDF Quick Reference Guide by clicking the image below.

Assault Weapon Quick Reference Guide



Featureless Rifle Build Instructions




Due to the recent ruling (March 29th, 2019) in Duncan v Becerra concerning magazine capacity, we have added these next two graphics to clarify some questions that we've been receiving.

Featureless Rifle Flow Chart



Fixed Mag Rifle Flow Chart



CRPA ALERT: Moving Forward with “Large Capacity” Magazine Court Ordered Stay
Click the image below for an unedited PDF version for download and easy printing (in case you would like to keep this with you and your firearms/magazines). CRPA Magazine Bulletin 4-8-19

Here is the link to the original Information Bulletin from the California Rifle and Pistol Association about the current situation concerning legalities of standard capacity magazines. CRPA Magazine Capacity Bulletin



Letter from DOJ to all CA law enforcement that it is legal to possess these magazines

Print out this PDF and toss in your range bag. Letter from DOJ to all CA law enforcement



“Large Capacity” Magazine Update

Gun owners in CA recently had a win back in August of 2020 when the 9th Circuit 3 judge panel agreed with Judge Benitez's ruling on magazine capacity limits being unconstitutional. BUT, on March 10th 2021, the 9th Circuit vacated that ruling from the 3 judge panel and decided to hear the Duncan v. Becerra case en banc.

Definition: en banc (on bonk) French for "in the bench," it signifies a decision by the full court of all the appeals judges in jurisdictions where there is more than one three- or four-judge panel. For the 9th Circuit, it means a full 12 judge panel.

On May 7th 2021, both parties in this lawsuit asked the 9th Circuit to hold the case and wait until the Supreme Court outcome of New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Corlett (which is challenging New York’s laws regulating the carry of firearms outside the home). We think the 9th will agree to this. This SCOTUS hearing may happen some time in 2022, then Duncan v. Becerra can be hear en banc in 2022 or 2023.

In the mean time, it is still legal to posses and use legally obtained normal capacity magazines (in featureless rifles and handguns*). Local municipalities in CA may have stricter ordinances to check with first. *handguns, not AR/AK pistols etc. which would be considered an "AW" because of other features like the magazine being located outside the grip, threaded barrels, etc.



- We are currently working on some helpful information concerning building featureless rifles and hope to have that here soon.

In the mean time, here are some web links that may be helpful.